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Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Movie News

Three of the kids cast in "Goosebumps: Haunted Halloween" are gonna have tons of cash for Halloween this year ... 'cause their checks are pretty fat. Jeremy Ray Taylor, Caleel Harris and Peyton Wich are three of the teenagers who will appear in the sequel -- slated for, of course, an October release. While their salaries are pretty great for their age, not all pay's the same across the board ... this according to the minors contracts obtained by TMZ. Jeremy, for example, bolsters a stronger resume with Stephen King's "It" under his belt and the sequel already in the bag. The 14-year-old is also one of the main characters for the R.L. Stine thriller so it makes sense he's getting the most -- $100k and, if the flick kicks ass at the box office, he stands to earn another $300k in bonuses. Yikes! Caleel, 14, is getting $75k for his role and 15-year-old Peyton, who has a smaller role in the film, will earn at least $13,280 for 4 weeks of work. Lemonade stands be damned. (TMZ)

Cannes: Matt Dillion Is Murderous in First Trailer for Lars Von Trier's 'The House That Jack Built'. Matt Dillon stars as a serial killer in the controversial Danish director's new film, which premieres Monday night in Cannes. IFC Films on Monday dropped the first trailer for Lars von Trier's The House That Jack Built. And it's exactly as disturbing, and intriguing, as you'd imagine the latest from the director of Melancholia, Nymphomaniac and Antichrist would be. Matt Dillon stars as Jack, a serial killer who views his murders as elaborate works of art. Uma Thurman, Riley Keough and Bruno Ganz co-star. The film premieres in Cannes, out of competition, Monday night. It will be Von Trier's first appearance in Cannes since Melancholia in 2011, when the director's jokes about "sympathizing with Hitler" got him temporarily banned for the festival. The trailer introduces Jack and his murderous methods, as well as sets up what appears to be the movie's thematic link between killing and creativity. Dillon is shown going about several brutal killings, as well as spouting philosophy, at one point noting: "Some people claim that the atrocities we commit in our fictions are those inner desires we cannot commit in our controlled civilization. So they are expressed instead through our art. I don't agree. I believe heaven and hell are one and the same. The soul belongs to heaven. And the body to hell." (Hollywood Reporter)

Cannes: Warner Bros. to Co-Produce Jiang Wen's Chinese Tentpole 'Hidden Man'. The film, set for release sometime this summer, is Jiang's first Chinese project since his 2014 hit 'Gone With the Bullets.' Warner Bros. has boarded Chinese actor-director Jiang Wen's forthcoming tentpole Hidden Man as a co-producer, The Hollywood Reporter has learned. The film, set for release sometime this summer, is Jiang's first Chinese project since 2014's Gone With the Bullets, which earned $81 million. Wen is a legend of the Chinese industry -- early work included a starring role in Zhang Yimou's classic Red Sorghum and Cannes Grand Prix winner Devils on the Doorstep -- but he became a familiar face to filmgoers worldwide thanks to his prominent role in Lucasfilm's Rogue One: A Star Wars Story as Baze Malbus. It's not yet clear whether Hidden Man will qualify as an official U.S.-China co-production, but Warner Bros. has a stake in the film as a co-financier. The investment was made via Flagship Entertainment, Warner's Hong Kong- and Beijing-based joint venture studio with Li Ruigang's CMC Capital Holdings. CMC's domestic Chinese production company, Gravity Pictures, is the project's main local producer. Hidden Man co-stars Wen and his wife, actress Zhou Yun, alongside Liao Fan (Black Coal, Thin Ice), Eddie Peng (Operation Mekong) and actress Xu Qing. Wen wrote the screenplay, which is based on a novel by Chinese writer Zhang Beihai. Story details are still being kept under wraps, but the film is set in the Republic of China during the 1920s. It loosely follows Wen's prior two period action flicks Let the Bullets

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