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Music Calendar...

In 1954 RCA Victor reduced the price of an album to $3.99. In 1955 Elvis Presley's first live appearance was held at the Memphis, TN, auditorium. In 1960 "Earth Angel" composer/singer Jesse Belvin was killed in a car accident. In 1965 "Ferry Cross The Mercy" by Gerry and the Pacemakers entered the U.S. top 40 charts. In 1965 "You Lost That Lovin' Feeling" by the Righteous Brothers hit #1 on the U.S. top 40 charts and stayed there for 2 weeks. In 1966 Simon & Garfunkel and the Animals were musical guests on CBS-TV's "Ed Sullivan Show." In 1970 The New York Post uncovered Charles Manson's fixation with the Beatles' "Helter Skelter." In 1970 John Lennon's single "Instant Karma" was released in the UK on Apple Records. In 1971 Conway Twitty & Loretta Lynn debuted on the U.S. Country charts as a duo with "After The Fire Has Gone." In 1971 "For All We Know" by the Carpenters and &q

Today In History...

In 1693 The College of William and Mary was chartered in Williamsburg, VA. In 1778 France became the first nation to recognize American independence. In 1788 Massachusetts became the 6th U.S. state. In 1815 The state of New Jersey issued the first American railroad charter to John Stevens. In 1899, the Senate ratified a peace treaty between the U.S. and Spain. In 1922 The U.S., Britain, France, Italy, and Japan signed a Washington naval arms limitation agreement. In 1933 The 20th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, the "lame duck" amendment, went into effect, changing the date of presidential inaugurations from March to January. In 1943 A Los Angeles jury acquitted actor Errol Flynn of three counts of statutory rape. In 1952 Britain's King George VI died and was succeeded to the throne by his daughter Elizabeth II. In 1959 Fidel Castro was interviewed by Edward R. Murrow. In 1959, the U.S. successfully test-fires a Titan intercontinental ballistic missile from Cape Canave

Born On This Day...

In 1637 Toyotomi Hideyoshi unified Japan In 1665 Queen Anne Of England (1702-14) In 1756 Aaron Burr, third U.S. vice-president (1801-05) In 1802 Inventor, Sir Charles Wheatstone (the telegraph) In 1814 Educator, Edward Frederick Sorin (founded the University of Notre Dame) In 1838 English actor Sir Henry Irving (Hamlet) In 1895 Baseball Hall-of-Famer, George Herman "Babe" Ruth (Yankees) In 1899 Mexican actor, Ramon Novarro (Ben Hur, Mata Hari) In 1902 Lawyer, Louis Nizer (defended blacklisted 50's stars) [d: 11-10-94] In 1903 Pianist/composer Claudio Arrau (Boston Symphony) [d: 6-9-91] In 1911 Ronald Reagan, the 40th U.S. president (1981-1989) [d: 6-5-04] In 1913 Actor, John Lund (My Friend Irma, High Society) [d: 5-10-92] In 1914 Actor, Thurl Ravenscroft (voice of Tony the Tiger) [d: 5-22-05] In 1917 Actress, Zsa Zsa Gabor (Man Who Wouldn't Talk, Moulin Rouge) [d: 12-18-16] In 1922 Actor, Patrick Macnee (The Avengers, A View To A Kill) [d: 6-25-15] In 1926 Baseball p

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Music Calendar...

In 1862 The "Battle Hymn of the Republic," a poem by Julia Ward Howe is published in the Atlantic Monthly. In 1893 Giacomo Puccini's opera "Manon Lescaut" premieres in Turin, Italy. In 1896 The Puccini opera "La Boheme" premieres in Turin. In 1950 RCA introduces the first 45 rpm record player. In 1960 "Wild One" by Bobby Rydell enters the U.S. top 40 chart. In 1963 Bobby Darin purchases the Trinity Music publishing firm. In 1964 Matthew Welsh, the governor of Indiana, issues a ban on "Louie Louie" by the Kingsmen, calling it "pornographic." In 1964 Bob Dylan's album "The Times They Are A Changin'" is released. In 1964 "Dawn (Go Away)" by the Four Seasons enters the U.S. top 40 chart. In 1964 "I Want To Hold Your Hand" by the Beatles hits #1 on the U.S. top40 chart and stayed there for 7 weeks. In 1965 The Rolling Stones' album "The Rolling Stones Now" is released. In 1967

Today In History...

In 1709 Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe was rescued. In 1790 The U.S. Supreme Court convened for the first time at the Royal Exchange Building on Broad Street in New York. In 1861 Texas voted to secede from the Union during the Civil War. In 1862 The "Battle Hymn of the Republic," a poem by Julia Ward Howe, was published in the Atlantic Monthly. In 1867 Bricklayers started working 8-hour days. In 1893 Thomas Edison completed work on the world's first motion picture studio in West Orange, New Jersey. In 1898 The Travelers Insurance Company of Hartford, CT, issued the first auto insurance policy to Dr. Truman J. Martin of Buffalo, New York, for $11.05. In 1914 Pennsylvania created the first movie censorship board. In 1920 The first armored car was introduced. In 1920 The Royal Canadian Mounted Police was formed when the RoyalNorthwest Mounted Police merged with the Dominion Police. In 1943 One of America's most decorated military units of World War II, the 442nd Regi

Born On This Day...

In 1791 Inventor, Charles J. Sax (saxophone) In 1805 French revolutionary leader, Auguste Blanqui In 1828 Financier/industrialist, Meyer Guggenheim In 1838 Cartoonist, Joseph Keppler (founded the first successful U.S. weekly) In 1844 Psychologist/educator Granville Hall (developed child psychology) In 1850 Politician, Hattie Caraway (the first woman elected to U.S. Senate) In 1859 Conductor/songwriter Victor August Herbert (Babes in Toyland) In 1887 Author/publisher Harry Scherman (co-founded the Book of the Month club) In 1894 Songwriter, Herman Hupfield (As Time Goes By) In 1894 Jazz pianist/composer James Price Johnson (Charleston) In 1895 Film director John Ford (The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance) In 1901 Actor, Clark Gable (Gone With The Wind) [d: 11-16-60] In 1902 Poet/playwright Langston Hughes (The Weary Blues) [d: 5-22-67] In 1904 Trombonist, Joe "Tricky Sam" Nanton (Duke Ellington) [d: 7-20-46] In 1904 Author, S.J. Perelman (Around The World In 80 Days) [d: 10-17-79]