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Showing posts from April, 2023

Music Calendar...

In 1941 Ernest Tubb recorded "Walking The Floor Over You." In 1960 Filming began on the Elvis Presley movie "G.I. Blues." In 1964 The Beatles attended Roy Orbison's belated 28th birthday party in London. In 1967 16-year-old Janis Ian sang "Society's Child" on the CBS unique "Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution" hosted by Leonard Bernstein. In 1969 "Oh Happy Day" by Edwin Hawkins Singers entered the U.S. Top 40 charts. In 1970 The Broadway musical "Company," by Stephen Sondheim and George Furth, opened at the Alvin Theatre in New York. In 1971 "Help Me Make It Through The Night" by Sammi Smith went gold. In 1975 "Old Days" by Chicago entered the U.S. Top 40 chart. In 1975 "(Hey Won't You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song" by B.J. Thomas is #1 on the U.S. Top 40 chart. In 1976 The Rolling Stones' album "Black & Blue" was certified gold. In 1977 New York's

Today In History...

In 1514 Copernicus made his first observations of Saturn. In 1607 An expedition of English colonists, including Captain John Smith, went ashore at Cape Henry, Virginia, to establish the first permanent English settlement in the New World. In 1865 12 days after killing President Abraham Lincoln, John Wilkes Booth was surrounded by federal troops near Bowling Green, VA, and killed. In 1880 The first scuba gear was demonstrated. In 1937 Planes from Nazi Germany raided the Basque town of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War. In 1941 The Nazis took control of Greece during World War II. In 1945 Marshal Henri Philippe Petain, the head of France's Vichy government during World War II was arrested. In 1954 Nationwide tests of the Salk anti-polio vaccine begin. In 1961 Roger Maris hit the first of a record 61 home runs in a single season at Tiger Stadium in Detroit. In 1964 The African nations of Tanganyika and Zanzibar merged to form Tanzania. In 1968, the U.S. exploded a one-megaton nucl

Born On This Day...

In 1659 Novelist/journalist Daniel Defoe (Robinson Crusoe) In 1718 Naval Officer Esek Hopkins (the first U.S. naval commodore) In 1785 American artist/naturalist, John James Audubon In 1802 Educator, Calvin Ellis Stowe (professor of biblical studies) In 1812 Businessman, Alfred Krupp (armaments and munitions magnate) In 1822 Landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted (Central Park) In 1834 American humorist Artemus Ward (influenced by Mark Twain) In 1879 Physicist, Sir Owen Richardson (electron emission by hot metals) In 1884 Actor, Harry Sothern (Dr. Huer-Buck Rogers) In 1886 Blues singer Gertrude "Ma" Rainey ("Mother of the Blues") In 1890 Actor, Edgar Kennedy (Keystone Kops) In 1893 American author/playwright Anita Loos (Gentlemen Prefer Blondes) In 1894 Rudolf Hess, third in command of Nazi Germany In 1899 Merchant, Papa Joe (founded San Diego Fish Company) In 1899 Actor, Guinn Williams (Big Boy-Circus Boy) In 1900 Seismologist, Charles Richter (Richter Scale) [d

Links to KDAZ-db

Listen to KDAZ-db with your media player using this URL streaming.live365.com/a90407 or listen https://mytuner-radio.com/radio/desert-radio-az-441417 or https://tunein.com/radio/Desert-Radio-AZ-s249583/

Music Calendar...

In 1956 "Heartbreak Hotel" by Elvis Presley hit #1 on the U.S. Top 40 charts and stayed there for 8 weeks. In 1958 "Twilight Time" by the Platters was #1 on the U.S. Top 40 charts. In 1960 Dick Clark told a Congressional Committee investigating "payola" that he had a financial interest in over a quarter of the records he had played on "American Bandstand" the previous two years. He was ordered to sell off most of his holdings. In 1962 "Good Luck Charm" by Elvis Presley hit #1 on the U.S. Top 40 charts and stayed there for 2 weeks. In 1963 The Beatles met the Rolling Stones at the Crawdaddy Club in Richmond, England, and Lennon gave them "I Wanna Be Your Man." In 1965 The Beach Boys appeared on ABC-TV's "Shindig!" performing "Do You Wanna Dance?" In 1969 Janis Joplin made her UK debut at Royal Albert Hall. In 1969 Cream's album "Goodbye" is certified gold. In 1970 Elton John made his solo c

Today In History...

In 1649, the Maryland assembly passed the Maryland Toleration Act, which provided all Christians the freedom of worship. In 1789 John Adams was sworn in as the first U.S. vice president. In 1836 Texas became an independent nation when Sam Houston defeated Santa Ana in the Battle of San Jacinto near present-day Houston. In 1862 Congress established a U.S. Mint in Denver, Colorado. In 1910 Author Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain) died in Redding, CT. In 1918 German air ace Manfred Von Richthofen (The Red Baron) was shot out of the sky by Canadian pilot Roy Brown during World War I. In 1940 The quiz show that asked the "$64 question," "Take It Or Leave It," premiered on CBS Radio. In 1960 Brazil inaugurated its new capital, Brasilia, transferring the seat of national government from Rio de Janeiro. In 1962 The World's Fair in Seattle opened. In 1966, Texas surgeon Michael De Bakey achieved the first artificial heart implant. In 1967 Svetlana Alliluyeva, the daughter of S

Born On This Day...

In 1729 Empress Catherine The Great II Of Russia (1762-96) In 1782 German educator Friedrich Froebel (founded a kindergarten) In 1816 English novelist Charlotte Bronte (Jane Eyre) In 1820 English inventor James Starley (the geared bicycle) In 1837 Danish politician Fredrik Bajer (Nobel 1908) In 1838 Naturalist/explorer John Muir (Sierra Club) In 1849 German embryologist, Oskar Hertwig In 1864 German scientist/professor Max Weber (liberal imperialism) In 1870 Producer/director Edwin Porter (co-invented the motion picture camera) In 1887 Baseball Hall-of-Famer Joe McCarthy (won 2126 games and 9 pennants) In 1898 Football Hall-of-Famer, Steve Owen (Giants) In 1907 Singer/actress Beatrice Kay (Calvin & The Colonel) [d: 11-8-86] In 1908 Jazz performer Alfred Lion (founded Blue Note Records) [d: 2-2-87] In 1909 Psychologist, Dr. Rollo May [d: 10-22-94] In 1915 Actor, Anthony Quinn (Zorba the Greek) [d: 6-3-01] In 1916 Actor, Sidney Clute (Lou Grant, Cagney & Lacey) [d: 10-2-85] In 19

Music Calendar...

In 1940 "In the Mood" by the Glenn Miller Orchestra was #1 on the charts. In 1957 "All Shook Up" by Elvis Presley hit #1 on the U.S. Top 40 charts and stayed there for 8 weeks. In 1958 Van Cliburn became the first American to win the Tchaikovsky International Piano Contest in Moscow. In 1959 "Kansas City" by Wilbert Harrison entered the U.S. Top 40 charts. In 1959 "Come Softly To Me" by the Fleetwoods hit #1 on the U.S. Top 40 charts and stayed there for 4 weeks. In 1963 Buck Owens entered the U.S. Country charts with "Act Naturally." In 1965 The Beatles recorded "Help!" In 1965 Roger Miller won a then-record 5 Grammy Awards, while the Beatles won their first two Grammys, including one for Best New Artist. Bill Cosby wins the first of six straight Comedy Grammys. In 1966 The Beatles recorded "Paperback Writer" at Abbey Road studios in London. In 1967 The Rolling Stones played their first concert behind the Iron Curta

Today In History...

In 1598 King Henry IV of France signed the Edict of Nantes, which granted rights to the Protestant Huguenots. In 1742 George Frederic Handel's "Messiah" was performed publicly for the first time at the New Music Hall in Dublin, Ireland. In 1796 The first elephant arrived in America for exhibition. In 1870 The Metropolitan Museum of Art was founded in New York. In 1943 President Franklin Roosevelt dedicated the Jefferson Memorial in Washington, DC. In 1961 The U.N. General Assembly voted to condemn apartheid, South Africa's policy of racial segregation. In 1964 Ian Smith became the prime minister of Rhodesia. In 1964 Sidney Poitier became the first black to be voted Best Actor for his performance in "Lilies of the Field." In 1970 While on the way to the moon, a liquid oxygen tank bursts on Apollo XIII, crippling the craft and threatening the crew's lives. The team was able to return safely to Earth four days later. In 1976 The U.S. offshore fishing limit

Born On This Day...

In 1519 Queen Catherine de Medici (consort of King Henry II of France) In 1710 Explorer/author Jonathan Carver (explored North America) In 1721 Revolutionary, John Hanson (the first president of the Continental Congress) In 1728 Mathematician/physicist Paolo Frisi (hydraulics) In 1743 Thomas Jefferson, 3rd U.S. president (1801-1809) In 1749 English inventor Joseph Bramah (Pick-Proof Lock, Hydraulic Press) In 1771 British inventor Richard Trevithick (steam locomotive) In 1816 British conductor/composer, Sir William Bennett In 1852 Merchant, F.W. Woolworth (the "five-and-dime" king) In 1892 Physicist, Sir Robert Watson-Watt (refined radar) In 1899 Inventor/architect Alfred Mosher Butts (Scrabble) In 1903 Actor, Rex Evans (Frankenstein Meets the Wolfman) [d: 4-3-69] In 1906 Author/critic/playwright Samuel Beckett (Nobel 1969) [d: 12-22-89] In 1906 Jazz saxophonist Lawrence "Bud" Freeman [d: 3-15-91] In 1909 Writer, Eudora Welty (Optimist's Daughter-Pulitzer 1973) [

Daily Horoscope April 13th, 2023

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On This Day, April 12 2023

  Desert Radio AZ Podcasts · On This Day - April 12 2023

Music Calendar...

In 1939 Woody Herman's Orchestra recorded "Woodchopper's Ball." In 1954 Joe Turner's single "Shake, Rattle & Roll" was released. In 1954 Billy Haley and the Comets recorded "Rock Around The Clock." In 1961 Percy Faith's "Theme From A Summer Place" won the Best Record Grammy, and Bob Newhart's "Button Down Mind" won Best Album. In 1964 Chubby Checker married former Miss World Catherina Lodders. In 1964 "It's Over" by Roy Orbison entered the U.S. Top 40 charts. In 1966 After crashing his Corvette into a parked truck in Los Angeles, Jan & Dean's Jan Berry was paralyzed for a year. In 1968 Life magazine featured an article on the Doors entitled "Wicked Go The Doors." In 1968 The Turtles' album "Turtles' Greatest Hits" was certified gold. In 1969 Simon & Garfunkel won the Record of the Year Grammy for "Mrs. Robinson," and Jose Feliciano won Best New Artis

Today In History...

In 1606 England adopted the original version of the Union Jack as its flag. In 1844 Texas became a U.S. territory. In 1853 The first truancy law was enacted in New York. A $50 fine was issued to parents whose children, aged 5-15, were absent from school. In 1861 Fort Sumter, South Carolina, was shelled by the Confederacy, starting the Civil War. In 1862 Union volunteers led by James J. Andrews stole a Confederate train near Marietta, Georgia, but were later caught. In 1877 The catcher's mask was first used in a baseball game. In 1892 The portable typewriter was patented by George C. Blickensderfer. In 1894 A 3-day snowstorm dumped 30 inches on Pennsylvania and New York. In 1934 The highest-velocity wind ever recorded, 231 mph, occurred at the Mount Washington Observatory in New Hampshire. In 1934, F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel "Tender is the Night" was first published by Scribner in New York. In 1945 President Franklin D. Roosevelt died of a cerebral hemorrhage, and Har

Born On This Day...

In 1724 Governor Lyman Hall (signed the Declaration of Independence) In 1777 Politician/statesman Henry Clay (The Great Compromiser) In 1791 Republican party founder Francis P. Blair In 1831 Engineer, Grenville Dodge (Union Pacific Railroad chief engineer) In 1838 American librarian, John Billing Shaw In 1892 Jazz musician, Johnny Dodds In 1904 Opera soprano Lily Pons (Metropolitan Opera) [d: 2-13-76] In 1912 Singer, Herbert Mills (The Mills Brothers) [d: 4-12-89] In 1913 Sportscaster/actor Jimmy Lennon (Raging Bull, Rocky) [d: 4-20-92] In 1917 Blues singer/guitarist Hound Dog Taylor [d: 12-17-75] In 1918 Singer, Helen Forrest (Harry James, Benny Goodman) [d: 7-11-99] In 1919 Singer/arranger Billy Vaughn (Melody of Love) [d: 9-26-91] In 1923 Actress/dancer Ann Miller (Great American Pastime) [d: 1-22-04] In 1926 Actress, Jane Withers (Josephine the plumber) [d: 8-7-21] In 1932 Singer, Tiny Tim (Tiptoe Through The Tulips) [d: 11-30-96] In 1933 Spanish opera singer, Montserrat Caballe [d

Today In History...

In 1689 William III and Mary II were crowned as joint sovereigns of Britain. In 1814 Napoleon Bonaparte abdicated as emperor of France and was banished to the island of Elba. In 1876 The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks was organized. In 1898 President McKinley asked Congress for a declaration of war against Spain. In 1899 The treaty ending the Spanish-American War was declared in effect. In 1921 Iowa became the first state to impose a cigarette tax. In 1945 During World War II, American soldiers liberated Buchenwald, the notorious Nazi concentration camp in eastern Germany. In 1947 Jackie Robinson became the first black player in major league baseball, playing in an exhibition game between the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Yankees. In 1951 General Douglas MacArthur was relieved of command in Korea by President Harry Truman for not following orders. In 1953 Oveta Culp Hobby became the first Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare. In 1957 The Ryan X-13 Vertijet became th

Born On This Day...

In 1794 American statesman, Edward Everett In 1862 Astronomer, William W. Campbell (stellar motions) In 1862 Charles Evans Hughes, the 11th chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court In 1888 English actor Donald Calthrop (Scrooge) In 1889 Cornetist, Dominic James "Nick" LaRocca (Dixieline Jazz Band) In 1899 Chemist, Percy Julian (held more than 138 chemical patents) In 1902 Newscaster, Quentin Reynolds (It's News To Me) [d: 3-17-65] In 1906 Cartoonist, Dale Messick (Brenda Starr) [d: 4-5-05] In 1908 Author, Leo Rosten (The Joys Of Yiddish) [d: 2-19-97] In 1911 U.S. 100m runner Stella Walsh (Olympic-Gold-1932) [d: 12-4-80] In 1912 Actor, John Larkin (12 O'Clock High, Edge of Night) [d: 1-29-65] In 1913 Fashion designer Oleg Cassini (Jackie Kennedy) [d: 3-17-06] In 1916 Football Hall-of-Famer, Dan Fortmann (Bears) [d: 5-23-95] In 1916 Producer/director Howard Koch (The Odd Couple) [d: 2-16-01] In 1918 Journalist, Jean-Claude Servan-Schreiber [d: 4-11-18] In 1919 Former New

Music Calendar...

In 1939 Glenn Miller's band recorded "Little Brown Jug" and "Sunrise Serenade" for Bluebird Records. In 1956 Nat "King" Cole was attacked and severely beaten onstage in Birmingham, AL, by a group of segregationists. In 1956 The Stratocaster was patented by Leo Fender. In 1957 Ricky Nelson made his singing debut on TV's "Ozzie & Harriet," performing "I'm Walkin'" at 16. In 1958 Bobby Darin recorded "Splish Splash." In 1958 Singer/songwriter Chuck Willis ("C.C. Rider," "What Am I Living For") died from peritonitis at age 38. In 1961 Del Shannon debuted on "American Bandstand," performing "Runaway." In 1962 Original Beatles bassist Stuart Sutcliffe died of cerebral paralysis. In 1964 Barbra Streisand appeared on the cover of Time magazine. In 1964 "The Beatles Second Album" (they're third) was released in the U.S. In 1965 "It's Not Unusual" by

Today In History...

In 1790 Robert Gray was the first American to sail around the world. His trip began in September 1787. In 1790 The U.S. Patent system was established. In 1849 The Safety pin was patented by Walter Hunt of New York City. In 1866 The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was established. In 1872 The first Arbor Day was celebrated in Nebraska. It was later changed to the last Friday in April. In 1912 The luxury liner RMS Titanic set sail from Southampton, England, on its ill-fated maiden voyage. (On April 14, the ship struck an iceberg in the North Atlantic and sank. About 1,500 people died.) In 1925 F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby" was published. In 1932 German president Paul Von Hindenburg was re-elected, with Adolph Hitler coming in second. In 1945 During World War II, U.S. troops liberated the Buchenwald death camp in Germany. In 1953 The first 3-D movie, "House Of Wax," starring Vincent Price, was released in New York. In 1959 Japan

Born On This Day...

In 1512 King James V Of Scotland (1513-1542) In 1583 Dutch theologian/attorney Hugo Grotius (International Law) In 1735 Revolutionary, Button Gwinnett (signed the Declaration of Independence) In 1794 Military leader Matthew Galbraith Perry (Commodore of the U.S. Navy) In 1827 Attorney/author Lew Wallace (Ben Hur) In 1829 Social reformer General William Booth (founded Salvation Army) In 1847 American journalist Joseph Pulitzer (founded Pulitzer Prize) In 1879 Businessman, John Hertz (Yellowcab Company) In 1880 Secretary of Labor Francis Perkins (the first woman cabinet member) In 1885 Merchant, Bernard F. Gimbel (Gimbel Brothers Chain Store) In 1891 Actor, Colonel Tim McCoy (starred in early American Westerns) In 1903 Congressperson/author Clare Boothe Luce [d: 10-9-87] In 1907 U.S. diver, Pete Desjardins (Olympic-Gold-1928) [d: 5-6-85] In 1908 Inventor, Joe Valdez Caballero (hard taco shell) [d: 5-12-89] In 1909 Football Hall-of-Famer, W. Clarke Hinkle (Packers) [d: 11-9-88] In 1909 Ac

Top Box Office Week Ending 4-2-23

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FACTS ABOUT EASTER

( parkrideflyusa.com ) Easter Sunday is this weekend, and while you are coloring eggs, eating chocolate bunnies, and searching your home for hidden treats, here are some facts to share with your family and friends. 1. Easter is the celebration of the resurrection of Christ three days after his death. It is the oldest Christian holiday and the most important day of the church year. 2. Christians consider Easter eggs to symbolize joy and celebration, new life and resurrection. 3. Households spend over $140 on Easter each year, $15 billion. 4. After Halloween, Easter is the biggest candy-consuming holiday. 120 million pounds of candy are bought each year, enough to fill four dump trucks. 5. 90 million chocolate bunnies, 91.4 billion eggs, and 700 million peeps are produced yearly in the United States. 6. 76% of people eat the ears of chocolate bunnies first. 7. Americans consume over 16 million jellybeans on Easter, enough to circle the globe thrice. 8. Half of the states in the United St

Music Calendar...

In 1956 Capitol Tower, the home of Capitol Records in Hollywood, was dedicated. The 13-story building was the first circular office tower designed in America. In 1956 Paramount Pictures signed Elvis Presley to a 3-picture deal. In 1957 Brenda Lee debuted on the U.S. Country chart with "One Step At A Time." She was just 12 years old. In 1957 "All Shook Up" by Elvis Presley and "School Day" by Chuck Berry entered the U.S. Top 40 charts. In 1957 "Round And Round" by Perry Como was #1, and "Little Darlin'" by the Diamonds was #2 on the U.S. Top 40 charts. In 1965 The Beach Boys began recording "California Girls." In 1968 The Beatles launched Apple Corps Ltd., their new record company and management and publishing firm, in London. In 1968 Pink Floyd founder and lead guitarist Syd Barrett left the group. In 1968 "Mony Mony" by Tommy James & the Shondells entered the U.S. Top 40 charts. In 1970 The members of Led Ze

Today In History...

In 1663 King Charles II signed the Carolina Charter. In 1830 Joseph Smith organized the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (the Mormon Church) in Fayette, New York. In 1862 The Civil War Battle of Shiloh began as the Confederate Army attacked Union forces in Tennessee. In 1868 Brigham Young married wife number 27, his final. In 1896 The first modern Olympic Games began in Athens, Greece. In 1906 The first animated cartoon was copyrighted. In 1909 American explorers Robert Peary and Matthew Henson became the first men to reach the North Pole. In 1917 The U.S. declared war on Germany and entered World War I. In 1926 4 planes took off on the first successful around-the-world flight. In 1931 The Hostess "Twinkie" went on sale. In 1936 A tornado killed 203 people in Gainesville, Georgia. In 1963 The U.S. and Britain signed an agreement under which the Americans would sell "Polaris" A-3 missiles to the British. In 1965 The U.S. launched the Early Bird Communicati

Born On This Day...

In 1483 Italian painter, Raffaello Santi (Raphael) In 1992 Singer, Emmalyn Estrada (G.R.L.) (31) In 1773 Philosopher/historian, James Mill In 1810 Inventor, Philip Henry Gosse (institutional aquarium) In 1823 Newspaper editor Joseph Medill (Chicago Tribune) In 1866 Outlaw, Butch Cassidy (and the Sundance Kid) In 1866 Journalist, Lincoln Steffens In 1882 Social reformer Rose Schneiderman (president of WTUL) In 1883 Singer, Vernon Dalhart In 1884 Actor, Walter Huston (Maltese Falcon, Treasure of Sierra Madre) In 1890 Aircraft manufacturer, Anthony Herman Gerard Fokker In 1892 Businessman, Donald Wills Douglas (founded Douglas Aircraft) In 1892 Journalist, Lowell Thomas ("So long until tomorrow...") In 1900 Songwriter, Leo Robin (Thanks For the Memories) [d: 12-29-84] In 1903 Engineer Harold Edgerton (high-speed photography) [d: 1-4-90] In 1903 Baseball Hall-of-Famer, Mickey Cochrane (.320 avg) [d: 6-28-62] In 1913 Country singer/fiddler Wade Ray (Sons of the Pioneers) [d: 11-11

It's Go for Broke Day!

Amid World War II, a group of Japanese American soldiers was fighting for their country, even when their country had turned its back on them. The 442nd Infantry Regiment was formed in response to the forced evacuation of Japanese Americans from the West Coast and their subsequent internment in camps nationwide. These soldiers were determined to prove their loyalty to the United States, even while facing discrimination and racism from their fellow citizens. The unit's motto, "Go for Broke," reflected their determination to give their all, no matter the cost. The phrase was slang among gamblers in Hawaii, where many soldiers had grown up before the war. It meant to wager everything, to risk everything for the chance to win big. For the soldiers of the 442nd, it meant putting their lives on the line to serve a country that had treated them as second-class citizens. The 442nd Infantry Regiment was sent to Europe, where they would fight in some of the war's deadliest battl

FOOD NEWS

Heinz is going hot, with some spicy ketchup and steak sauce versions. Welcome to Tomato Ketchup Blended with Chipotle (a medium spicy option), Ketchup with JalapeƱo (hot), and Ketchup with Habanero (more desirable). Also new: Heinz Hot 57 Sauce. Got milk? Fewer and fewer people do these days. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Americans' annual milk consumption peaked at 45 gallons per person in 1945. It fell to about 23 gallons in 2001, and by 2021 it was down to 16 gallons. They're saying that lab-grown chicken meat is getting closer and closer to reality. Would you? Ever wonder why they have green stripes on the sides of pre-packaged vegetables, like salads? They work magic on your eyes and make what's inside seem greener. Up in Canada, Costco has started selling Oreo Ice Cream. Don't know when it will arrive in the States. If you like IHOP, you will notice a massive makeover to their menu the next time you're in. It debuted on Monday. Heinz

Music Calendar...

In 1961 Barbra Striesand appears on "The Jack Paar Show." In 1964 The Searchers ("Needles & Pins") appeared on the "Ed Sullivan Show." In 1968 "Young Girl" by Gary Puckett & The Union Gap was certified gold. In 1969 "Grazing In The Grass" by Friends Of Distinction, "These Eyes" by Guess Who, and "Atlantis" by Donovan all entered the U.S. Top 40 charts. In 1974 The Guess Who hosted a celebrity tennis tournament in Toronto to benefit the National Ballet of Canada. In 1975 "Only Women Bleed" by Alice Cooper, "Bad Time" by Grand Funk, "Magic" by Pilot, and "Sister Golden Hair" by America all entered the U.S. Top 40 charts. In 1975 "Lovin' You" by Minnie Riperton was #1 on the U.S. Top 40 charts. In 1977 Jackson Browne, John Sebastian, J.D. Souther, Richie Havens, and others played a series of concerts in Tokyo to benefit efforts to protect whales and dolphins.