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Showing posts from March, 2023

Today In History...

In 1492 King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain issued an edict expelling Jews from Spanish soil, except those willing to convert to Christianity. In 1774 The British close the Boston port to commerce. In 1814 Forces allied against Napoleon to capture Paris. In 1831 Quebec and Montreal were incorporated as cities. In 1870 Thomas P. Mundy became the first black man to vote in the U.S. when he cast his ballot at a municipal election in Perth Amboy, NJ. In 1880 Wabash, Indiana, was the first town to be illuminated entirely with electric light. In 1889 French engineer Alexandre Gustave Eiffel officially opened the Eiffel Tower in Paris to the public. In 1917 The U.S. took possession of the Virgin Islands purchased from Denmark. In 1918 The first U.S. daylight savings time went into effect. In 1922 During the Great Depression, Congress authorized the Civilian Conservation Corps. In 1923 The first dance marathon was held in New York City, with Alma Cummings setting a world record of 27 ho

Born On This Day...

In 1499 Religious leader Pope Pius IV (1559-65) In 1519 King Henry II Of France (1547-59) In 1596 French philosopher Rene Descartes (father of modern philosophy) In 1621 English poet, Andrew Marvell In 1675 Religious leader Pope Benedict XIV (1740-1758) In 1732 Composer, Franz "Josef" Haydn (father of the symphony) In 1809 English author, Edward FitzGerald In 1809 Russian playwright/author Nikolai Vasilevich Gogol (Dead Souls) In 1811 German chemist, Robert Wilhelm Eberhard von Bunsen In 1854 Inventor, Sir Dugald Clerk (2-stroke motorcycle engine) In 1878 Boxer, Jack Johnson (the first black heavyweight champ, 1908) In 1893 Russian engineer Sergei Ilyushin (designed over 50 aircraft) In 1895 Attorney/diplomat John J. McCloy (headed World Bank) In 1907 Actor, Eddie Quillan (Julia, Poco-Hell Town) [d: 7-19-90] In 1908 Bandleader/jazz performer, "Red" Norvo [d: 4-6-99] In 1914 Poet/writer/diplomat Octavio Paz [d: 4-19-98] In 1915 Radio/TV personality Henry Morgan (I

"Game-changer alert: Gas and electric cooking tops now under new cooking appliances regulation!"

  KDAZ-db News The Department of Energy has proposed a new regulation for cooking appliances encompassing gas and electric cooking tops. This proposal has generated an outpouring of feedback, with the comment period ending on April 3. According to a revised analysis by the DOE, approximately half of currently marketed gas stove models in the US would disregard these regulations. Despite this, a measure from Gary Palmer, which prevents the Secretary of Energy from enforcing this proposal on gas stoves or any other rule that would restrict access to them, has been endorsed. This amendment passed with a vote of 251-181, with 29 Democrats joining the Republicans in approving it. Meanwhile, Richard Trumka Jr., Chief of the Consumer Product Safety Commission, also recommended that gas stoves be banned due to health concerns. Although the CPSC has not proposed any rules outlawing gas stoves, it has officially requested information on possible health hazards associated with their use. Other Re

U.S. Army Black Hawk helicopters crashed in Kentucky

In a routine training mission, two U.S. Army Black Hawk helicopters crashed in Kentucky, resulting in all nine service members' deaths. The crew members were flying two HH-60 Black Hawk helicopters when the crash occurred in Trigg County, Kentucky. The incident occurred around 25 miles northwest of Fort Campbell, the only air assault division in the U.S. Army. The service members' status remains unclear, and more information about the incident will be released as it becomes available. Governor Andy Beshear expressed his sympathies and will travel to Fort Campbell to support the troops and their families.

The Tom Green Show - Slutmobile

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The Tom Green Show - Condoms

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Music Calendar...

In 1942 "Jersey Bounce" by Benny Goodman and "I Don't Want To Walk Without You" by Bing Crosby debuted on the charts. In 1945 Ella Fitzgerald & the Delta Rhythm Boys recorded "It's Only A Paper Moon." In 1952 Sun Records in Memphis released its first record, "Drivin' Slow" by Johnny London. He was a 16-year-old black saxophone player. In 1957 12-year-old Brenda Lee debuts on the Country charts with "One Step At A Time." In 1958 CBS Laboratories announced a new stereophonic record that was mono-compatible and playable on both mono and stereo phonographs. In 1965 "I Can't Explain" by the Who and "The Last Time" by the Rolling Stones entered the U.S. top 40 charts. In 1965 "Stop! In The Name Of Love" by the Supremes was #1 on the U.S. top 40 charts. In 1967 The Rolling Stones were pelted with bottles, chairs, and fireworks while performing in Sweden. In 1967 The Young Rascals recorded "

Today In History...

In 1512 Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de Leon sights Florida. In 1625 Charles I, King of England, Scotland, and Ireland, ascended to the throne upon the death of James I. In 1794 President Washington and Congress authorized the creation of the U.S. Navy. In 1836 The first Morman temple was dedicated in Kirtland, Ohio. In 1855 Abraham Gesner received a patent for kerosene. In 1855 Congress spent $30,000 to import camels for the army in Texas and the southwest. In 1860 M.L. Byrn of New York received a patent for the corkscrew. In 1866 Andrew Rankin received a patent for the urinal. In 1884 The first long-distance telephone call was made between Boston and New York. In 1912 The first Japanese cherry trees were planted in Washington, DC. In 1917 The Seattle Metropolitans became the first U.S. team to win the Stanley Cup, defeating the Montreal Canadiens. In 1933 The U.S. Farm Credit Administration was authorized. In 1942 American service members were granted free mailing privileges. In 1945

Born On This Day...

In 1785 King Louis XVII Of France (1793-95) In 1813 Nathaniel Currier, lithographer (of Currier & Ives) In 1844 Publisher/explorer Adolphus Greeley (founded National Geographic) In 1845 Physicist, Wilhelm Rontgen (discovered X-rays) (Nobel, 1901) In 1847 German chemist Otto Wallach (Nobel 1910) In 1863 Businessman/engineer Sir Henry Royce (founded Rolls-Royce) In 1868 American schoolteacher Patty Smith Hill (wrote Happy Birthday) In 1879 Photographer, Edward Steichen (pioneered American photography) In 1892 Author, Thorne Smith In 1899 Actress, Gloria Swanson (Sunset Boulevard) In 1902 Architect, Erwin Wolfson (designed the Pan-Am building) [d: 6-26-62] In 1906 Jazz clarinetist, "Pee Wee" Russell [d: 2-15-69] In 1907 Actress/dancer Mary Treen (Joey Bishop Show) [d: 7-20-89] In 1912 British Prime Minister James Callaghan [d: 3-26-05] In 1914 Actor, Richard Denning (Hawaii Five-O) [d: 10-11-98] In 1914 Singer, Snooky Lanson (Your Hit Parade) [d: 7-2-90] In 1914 Author, Budd

At America’s Most Lawless Border (With Arizona Sheriff) ๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ฝ

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Fractured Fairy Tale "A Unique Talent"

  Desert Radio AZ Podcasts · Fractured Fairy Tale "A Unique Talent"

On This Day 3 7 23

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Music Calendar...

In 1896 Gilbert & Sullivan's last operetta, "Grand Duke," debuts in London. In 1917 The first jazz record, "The Dixie Jazz Band One-Step," was released. In 1939 Guy Lombardo & the Royal Canadians recorded "Auld Lang Syne." In 1960 "Sink The Bismarck" by Johnny Horton entered the U.S. top 40 charts. In 1962 The Beatles made their broadcasting debut on BBC radio. In 1964 "Dead Man's Curve" by Jan & Dean and "Needles & Pins" by the Searchers entered the U.S. top 40 charts. In 1967 Bobby Darin and actress Sandra Dee were divorced. In 1967 The Beatles finished recording "Lovely Rita." In 1969 The Who's single "Pinball Wizard" was released. In 1969 "Dizzy" by Tommy Roe was certified gold. In 1970 "Up The Ladder To The Roof" by the Supremes entered the U.S. top 40 charts. In 1973 "Dueling Banjos" by Eric Weissberg and "Your Mama Don't Dance" b

Today In History...

In 1644 Massachusetts established the first two-chamber legislature in the colonies. In 1778 Captain James Cook first sighted the Oregon coast at Yaquina Bay. In 1801 Massachusetts enacted the first state voter registration law. In 1850, in a 3-hour speech before the U.S. Senate, Daniel Webster endorsed the Compromise of 1850 to preserve the Union. In 1854 Charles Miller patented the first U.S. sewing machine to stitch buttonholes. In 1876 Alexander Graham Bell received a patent for the telephone. In 1897 Dr. John Kellogg served the world's first cornflakes to his patients at a mental hospital in Battle Creek, MI. In 1911 Coin-operated storage lockers were patented. In 1911 The U.S. sent 20,000 troops to the Mexican border as a precaution in the wake of the Mexican Revolution. In 1912 Roald Amundsen announced the discovery of the South Pole. In 1926 The first successful trans-Atlantic radio-telephone conversation occurred between New York and London. In 1932 Four were killed when 3

Born On This Day...

In 1707 Judge Stephen Hopkins (signed the Declaration of Independence) In 1707 Confederate army general John Bratton In 1849 Horticulturist/scientist, Luther Burbank In 1850 Statesman, Thomas Garrigue Masaryk (founder of Czechoslovakia) In 1857 Psychiatrist, Julius Wagner von Jauregg (Nobel 1927) In 1862 Inventor, Joseph Lee (pioneered playgrounds for kids) In 1872 Dutch abstract painter, Piet Mondrian In 1875 Composer, Maurice Joseph Ravel (Bolero) In 1908 Actress, Anna Magnani (Rose Tattoo, Miracle) [d: 9-26-73] In 1908 Jazz trumpeter, Nat Gonella [d: 8-6-98] In 1914 Stage director Morton da Costa (Music Man, Mame) [d: 1-29-89] In 1922 Basketball Hall-Of-Famer, Andy Phillip [d: 4-28-01] In 1924 Playwright, Kobo Abe (Woman, The Dunes) [d: 1-22-93] In 1929 Singer, Marion Marlowe (Arthur Godfrey & Friends) [d: 3-24-12] In 1930 Actor, James Broderick (Brenner, Doug-Family) [d: 11-1-82] In 1930 Photographer, Lord Snowdon (Princess Margaret's ex-) [d: 1-13-16] In 1931 Writer, Donal

TOP TEN MARINE CORPS RULES FOR GUN FIGHTING

  Desert Radio AZ Podcasts · TOP TEN MARINE CORPS RULES FOR GUN FIGHTING

On This Day 3-6-23

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Music Calendar...

"La Traviata" premieres in Venice, Italy. In 1913 The San Francisco Bulletin featured an article on Al Jolson in which they legitimized the term "jazz." In 1940 Harry James first recorded "Two O'Clock Jump." In 1959 The Drifters recorded "There Goes My Baby." In 1961 Del Shannon's first hits, "Runaway" and "Blue Moon" by the Marcels, entered the U.S. top 40 charts. In 1964 Elvis Presley's 14th film "Kissin' Cousins" premiered. In 1965 "My Girl" by the Temptations was #1 on the U.S. top 40 charts. In 1967 The Beatles finished recording "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band," the title track of their next album. In 1970 The Beatles' album "Hey Jude" was certified gold. In 1971 "Another Day" by Paul McCartney and "Chick-A-Boom" by Daddy Dewdrop entered the U.S. top 40 charts. In 1972 The U.S. Immigration Service canceled John Lennon's work vi

Today In History...

In 1521 Magellan discovered Guam. In 1665 "Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society" was published. In 1810 Illinois passed the first U.S. state vaccination legislation. In 1834 The Canadian city of York was renamed Toronto. In 1836 Davy Crockett, James Bowie, Col. William Travis, and 184 Texas soldiers were wiped out as the Alamo in San Antonio, Texas, fell into the hands of the Mexican Army. In 1857 The U.S. Supreme Court declared in its "Dred Scott" decision that Scott, an enslaved person, could not sue for his freedom in a federal court. In 1906 Nora Blatch was the first woman elected to the American Society of Civil Engineers. In 1930 Clarence Birdseye developed the quick-freezing food method. In 1933 President Franklin Roosevelt proclaimed a 10-day bank holiday. In 1935 Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes died. In 1944, U.S. bombers staged the first American raid against Berlin in World War II. In 1950 Silly Putty was invented. In 1

Born On This Day...

In 1475 Painter/sculptor Michelangelo (David) In 1619 Poet/playwright Cyrano de Bergerac (A Voyage to the Moon) In 1724 Statesman, Henry Laurens (President of the Continental Congress) In 1787 German physicist Joseph von Fraunhofer (studied the sun's spectrum) In 1791 American painter, Anna Claypoole Peale In 1806 English poet/author, Elizabeth Barrett Browning In 1812 Aaron Lufkin Dennison, father of American watchmaking In 1831 Civil war general Philip Sheridan (Union Army) In 1834 French illustrator/novelist George De Maurier (Punch) In 1891 Actor, Victor Kilian (Raymond-Mary Hartman Mary Hartman) In 1893 Singer/guitarist Furry Lewis (originated the bottleneck guitar) In 1898 NFL Hall-of-Famer, Jimmy Conzelman (owned Detroit Panthers) In 1899 Publisher, Richard Simon (co-founded Simon and Shuster) In 1900 Baseball player Robert "Lefty" Grove (300-game-winner) [d: 5-22-75] In 1903 U.S. diver Elizabeth Pinkston Becker (Olympic-Gold-1928) [d: 4-6-89] In 1905 Country legen

Born On This Day...

In 1611 English mathematician John Pell (introduced the division sign) In 1810 Polish composer/pianist, Frederic Chopin In 1837 Novelist/critic, William Dean Howells In 1848 Sculptor, Augustus Saint-Gaudens (designed a 1907 $20 gold piece) In 1882 Actress, Ida Moore (RCA Victor Show) In 1886 Avant-garde artist, Oskar Kokoschia In 1895 Edmund Fitzgerald (the ship named after him sunk in Lake Superior) In 1904 American bandleader Glenn Miller [d: 12-15-44] In 1904 Actor, Paul Hartman (Bert-Petticoat Junction) [d: 10-2-73] In 1910 Actor, David Niven (Casino Royale, The Rogues) [d: 7-29-83] In 1914 Jazz drummer Barrett Deems [d: 9-15-98] In 1914 Author, Ralph Waldo Ellison (Invisible Man) [d: 4-16-94] In 1917 Journalist, Ralph Gleason (co-founded Rolling Stone) [d: 6-3-75] In 1917 Poet, Robert Lowell (Lord Weary's Castle, Near the Ocean) [d: 9-12-77] In 1917 Singer, Dinah Shore (Dinah Shore Show) [d: 2-24-94] In 1917 Bassist/songwriter Cliffie Stone (Popcorn Song) [d: 1-17-98] In 1918