Today In History...

In 1789, Georgetown University was established in present-day Washington, DC.
In 1845, Congress decided that all national elections would be held on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November.
In 1849, English-born Elizabeth Blackwell became the first woman in America to receive a Doctor of Medicine (MD) degree.
In 1916, Montana set the world's record for a temperature change in 24 hours, dropping from 44 degrees to 56 below zero.
In 1920, the Dutch government refused to hand over the ex-kaiser of Germany despite demands from the victorious Allies.
In 1932, New York Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt announced his candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination.
In 1937, 17 people, including Karl Radek, went on trial in Moscow during Josef Stalin's "Great Purge."
In 1942, Congress appropriated $12.5 billion to purchase 33,000 airplanes.
In 1943, Critic Alexander Woollcoot suffered a fatal heart attack during a live broadcast of the CBS radio program "People's Platform."
In 1947, NBC broadcast the first educational program.
In 1950, The Israeli Knesset approved a resolution proclaiming Jerusalem the capital of Israel.
1960, the deepest ocean dive was made when Bathyscape Triste descended 35,820 feet (7 miles) into the Marianas Trench.
1964 The 24th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified, eliminating poll taxes in federal elections.
In 1968, North Korea seized the American intelligence-gathering ship USS Pueblo, killing one crewman and taking 82 hostages, charging it had intruded North Korean territorial waters on a spying mission.
In 1971, The temperature hit 80 below zero at Prospect Creek, Alaska.
In 1973, President Richard Nixon announced a cease-fire in Vietnam and that an accord had been reached to end the war.
In 1977, The miniseries "Roots," based on the Alex Haley novel, premiered on ABC-TV.
In 1982, A World Airways DC-10 skids off a Logan Airport runway into Boston harbor, killing 2 passengers.
In 1983, The "A-Team" premiered on NBC-TV.
In 1983, The Pentagon announced that an out-of-control, radioactive Soviet spy satellite crashed in the mid-Indian Ocean.
In 1983, Bjorn Born retired from tennis competition at age 26.
1984, President Reagan nominated White House Counselor Edwin Meese to succeed William French Smith as U.S. Attorney General.
In 1985, A debate in Britain's House of Lords was carried live on television for the first time as part of an experiment.
In 1986, New Hampshire schoolteacher Christa McAuliffe and her crewmates arrived in Cape Canaveral, FL, to prepare for their ill-fated flight aboard the space shuttle Challenger.
In 1988, More than 50,000 Israelis demonstrated in Tel Aviv to protest the treatment of Palestinians in the occupied territories.
In 1989, Earthquakes and mudslides destroyed dozens of villages in Soviet Central Asia.
In 1989, Surrealist artist Salvador Dali died in Spain at 84.
1990 The 101st Congress convened its second session, facing an agenda that included clean air legislation and deficit reduction.
In 1991, After some 12,000 sorties in the Gulf War, General Colin Powell, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said allied forces had achieved air superiority and would focus air fire on Iraqi ground forces around Kuwait.
In 1992, 47 nations, including the U.S., agreed on a massive global effort to provide food and medicine to millions of hungry people in the former Soviet Union.
In 1993, FBI Director William Sessions dismissed a Justice Department report accusing him of ethical abuses, accusing former Attorney General William P. Barr of a "crassly calculated attack."
In 1995, The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that companies were accused of illegally firing employees in Cape Canaveral, FL, to prepare for their flight aboard the space shuttle Challenger.
In 1988, More than 50,000 Israelis demonstrated in Tel Aviv to protest the treatment of Palestinians in the occupied territories.
In 1989, Earthquakes and mudslides destroyed dozens of villages in Soviet Central Asia.
In 1989, Surrealist artist Salvador Dali died in Spain at 84.
1990 The 101st Congress convened its second session, facing an agenda that included clean air legislation and deficit reduction.
In 1991, After some 12,000 sorties in the Gulf War, General Colin Powell, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said allied forces had achieved air superiority and would focus air fire on Iraqi ground forces around Kuwait.
In 1992, 47 nations, including the U.S., agreed on a massive global effort to provide food and medicine to millions of hungry people in the former Soviet Union.
In 1993, FBI Director William Sessions dismissed a Justice Department report accusing him of ethical abuses, accusing former Attorney General William P. Barr of a "crassly calculated attack."
In 1995, The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that companies accused of illegally firing employees could not escape liability by later finding a lawful reason to justify the dismissal.
In 1999, During his visit to Mexico, Pope John Paul II urged his followers in the Americas to make the region a "continent of life."
In 2001, Five Falun Gong followers set themselves on fire in China's Tiananmen Square, killing one.
2002, President Bush proposed the most significant defense spending increase in over 20 years.
In 2002, John Walker Lindh, a U.S.-born Taliban fighter, was returned to the U.S. to face criminal charges that he'd conspired to kill fellow Americans.
In 2002, Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl was abducted in Karachi, Pakistan; He was later murdered.
In 2004, The long-running sitcom "Friends" films its final episode.
In 2004, children's TV host Bob Keeshan, Captain Kangaroo, died from a long illness. He was 76.
In 2005, Johnny Carson, host of the "Tonight Show" host for 30 years before retiring in 1992, died of emphysema. He was 79.

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